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If you've forgotten why you went into a room, the door is a mistake

If you've forgotten why you went into a room, the door is a mistake



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According to researchers, our brains register as soon as we make a threshold.

If you've forgotten why you went into a room, the door is a mistake

Everybody had suddenly and completely forgotten when he had entered the room when he had entered it. Psychologists have been discovering these so-called "old moments" that can make us completely confused. Looks like our mind sees the doors as some sort of "event boundary", which marks the end of a memoir episode and the beginning of another.
Psychologists have shown that our brains usually store events and memories from one room as we go into another room, so that information is retrieved in sequential chapters or episodes. they serve as a sort of exclusive factor for the brain, whereupon our mind stores a chapter and goes on to the next.
Researchers at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, came to this conclusion after an experiment in which volunteers navigated through 55 different sized virtual rooms using numeric keyboards. Each room had one or two tables on which items were placed, which participants had to pick up, move to the other room and put on the table again. But as soon as the objects were picked up, they disappeared.
During the experiment, they were shown the name of an object and asked if they were taking it with them or whether it was already taken. The results showed that the performance of the memorial was much greater it deteriorated to a greater degree after they passed through a doorlike when they had the same distance from the same room.
To validate the results in real life, the researchers created a similar environment with real rooms and tables, and the items had to be placed in boxes that the volunteers took with them. Again, it turned out that the participants with greater certainty we forgot what's in the box, after entering a door into another room.
Experts explain this by saying that entering the new environment is likely to overwhelm working memory, thus failing to call back the original reason we entered the room. Extra information is overloaded and adds more and more information to work memory.